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Welcome to BAK’s temporary website.
We are gradually repurposing BAK’s visual identity, online platform, and new venue. We will soon be together otherwise.

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PROPOSITIONS FOR NON-FASCIST LIVING

Over the next four years, BAK unfolds its long-term research itinerary Propositions for Non-Fascist Living. Prompted by the dramatic resurfacing and normalization of fascisms, historical and contemporary, and inspired by philosopher Michel Foucault, BAK develops and gathers propositions for an “art of living counter to all forms of fascism, whether already present or impending,”1 including “the fascism in us all, in our heads and in our everyday behavior, the fascism that causes us to love power, to desire the very thing that dominates and exploits us.”2 Through its exhibitionary, discursive, and performative facets, Propositions for Non-Fascist Living attempts to articulate and inhabit methods of de-individualized living; methods in which multiplicity and difference enact relations other than those enamored with power and hierarchy, endeavoring to both articulate and inhabit options of being together otherwise.

1 Michel Foucault, preface to Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari (London: Continuum, [1984] 2004), p. xv.
2 Ibid., pp. xiv–xv.

Propositions #2:

Assemblism

Saturday 25 November 2017, Performative Conference

PAUWSTRAAT 13A, UTRECHT (new address!)
Studio Jonas Staal and DiEM25, New Unions: DiEM25, Athens, 2017, Yanis Varoufakis lectures in the New Unions: DiEM25, Athens installation in the Sporting Basket Arena, Athens. Photo: Jonas Staal

Propositions #2: Assemblism is a day-long gathering that addresses the current rise of the new authoritarian world order, and the millions of bodies that have gathered in resistance in liberated autonomous zones, occupied buildings, city squares, prisons, and cultural spaces to collectively enact a different demand for egalitarian society. What democratic cultures manifest through assemblist practices? And how do such democratic cultures contribute to establishing new forms of emancipatory (self-)governance? During this event, art workers, political representatives, and activists discuss the cultural dimensions of assemblist practices, from the pan-European movements to forms of non-human assembly, seeking new alliances. This is the second performative conference of Propositions for Non-Fascist Living The gathering takes place in a makeshift environment amid the renovation of BAK’s new venue and brings together diverse publics to take on the pressing concerns of our time. The program concludes with the book launch of poet, artist, and 2017–2018 BAK Fellow Quinsy Gario’s Roet in het Eten. Propositions #2: Assemblism is developed following the 2017 collaboration between BAK and Studio Jonas Staal’s campaign New Unions (2016–ongoing), with contributions from, among others, architect Paul Kuipers and designer Remco van Bladel. The campaign developed installations for the public assemblies of the pan-European Democracy in Europe Movement 2025 (DiEM25), which will be on display during the performative conference.

With

Barcelona en Comú, Black Lives Matter UK, Center for Spatial Justice, Council, DiEM25, European Alternatives, Freedom for Abdullah Öcalan/Peace in Kurdistan, Icelandic Pirate Party, Political Critique, State of Concept, and others; including Kate Shea Baird; Merve Bedir; Grégory Castéra; Maya Felixbrodt, Aurélie Lierman, and Samuel Vriezen; iLiana Fokianaki; Menno Grootveld; Havin Güneşer; Ernst van den Hemel; Birgitta Jónsdóttir; KUNCHENGA; Lorenzo Marsili; Shela Sheikh; Jonas Staal; and Igor Stokfiszewski

Attend the Event

Free passes available. The solidarity fund for this event collectively sponsors the attendance of those who otherwise cannot afford an event pass. If possible, we encourage you to purchase a pass that sponsors the attendance of someone accessing this option. If you otherwise would be unable to purchase a ticket, we encourage you to reserve a sponsored pass.

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Faust 3

Have we entered into a pact with the devil?

Frascati, Nes 63, Amsterdam
04.11.2017, 05.11.2017
Bread and Puppet Theater, Faust 3: Have we entered into a pact with the devil?, 2016. Photo: Ronald T. Simon

BAK, Utrecht and Frascati, Amsterdam bring Bread and Puppet Theater—one of the United States’ most celebrated socially engaged theater companies—back to the Netherlands. On Saturday 4 November and Sunday 5 November, Frascati hosts performances of the play Faust 3, written by Bread and Puppet Theater founder Peter Schumann, and produced and performed by Bread and Puppet Theater and local artists with migrant backgrounds. Founded in 1963, Bread and Puppet Theater is one of the oldest nonprofit, independent theater companies in the US. They perform all over the world, particularly in the open air—in public parks and on the streets— under the slogan “Cheap Art and Political Theater.” Inspired by Goethe’s Faust 1 and 2, Faust 3 takes us through a dreamy scape of today’s “proletariat”: from the experiences of refugee migration to the omnipresent threat of guns; from hunger to the contemporary diversity of foodstuffs. This production of Faust 3 stems from a five-day workshop in which members of the local community joined members of Bread and Puppet Theater to make the puppets and help produce the play, giving this version of Faust 3 a new, local, and individual twist. Characters—represented by the created objects, masks, and puppets—act out a historical narrative that chooses the side of the underdog. Faust 3 raises the question: What pact with the devil are we entering today, and can “the proletariat” still disrupt the established order in 2017? Faust 3 paints a grotesque picture of the world in which we live and weighs the possibilities for alternatives. The event is a Frascati Session at Frascati and part of BAK’s long-term research project Propositions for Non-Fascist Living.

Tickets are available on Frascati’s website

Propositions #1:

What We Mean

Saturday 7 October 2017, Performative Conference
BAK, Pauwstraat 13a, Utrecht (New Address!)

Propositions #1: What We Mean begins from an urgency for—and uncertainty about—what living in non-fascist ways could and does mean. The gathering takes place in a makeshift environment amid the renovation of BAK’s new venue. Through impromptu artworks, lectures, readings, discussions, screenings, performances, and explorations of the assembly—of being together—as an art form, Propositions #1: What We Mean practices art as thought and action intervening in the contemporary. Artistic interventions and the screening program remain on view Sunday 8 October 2017.

Download the press release

Ticketing

Alongside standard day passes for Propositions #1: What We Mean, you can opt into our solidarity fund, which supports the fees of those who wish to attend the event but are unable to purchase a standard day pass. Please see Propositions #1: What We Mean on Eventbrite for ticketing options and ways to donate.

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Program

12.00–12.30 hrs

PERFORMATIVE

MEZZANINE

FOYER

Manufacturing Mischiefs (working title), 2017

Pedro Reyes

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Script reading with actors, masks

Manufacturing Mischiefs is a script reading from a series of puppet sketches by artist Pedro Reyes. Reyes believes “jokes are a sort of airbag that cushions the collision of reality with your expectation of reality, laughter explodes simultaneously with the collision of ideology and realpolitik.” Featuring Noam Chomsky, Karl Marx, Ayn Rand, Donald Trump, and Elon Musk, this episode comments on the connections between techno-optimism and right-wing ideologies, pervasive in the United States and a primary source of Trumpism. This ideological screwball comedy interweaves issues of the destruction of labor by automation, artificial “intelligence,” and the menace of nuclear apocalypse.

12.30–13.00 hrs

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Welcome and Notes on Propositions #1: What We Mean

Maria Hlavajova and Matteo Lucchetti

Opening comments

13.00–14.45 hrs

EXHIBITIONARY

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Wutharr: Saltwater Dreams, 2015, film screening with introduction by Elizabeth A. Povinelli, followed by a conversation with Vivian Ziherl

Karrabing Film Collective

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Film, 29 min.

Wutharr: Saltwater Dreams comprises five ten-minute films shot by Karrabing members on iPhones. Filmmaking provides a technique of self-organization and social analysis. Film acts as a form of survival, a refusal to relinquish their country, and a means of investigating contemporary social forms of inequality; they make reference to third cinema, Boalean political theater, and an innovative local form of improvisational realism. The films represent the lives of the collective, create bonds with their land, and intervene in global images of Indigeneity.

14.45–15.00 hrs

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Video Statements

Sven Lütticken, Nina Power, and Giovanna Zapperi

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Three short videos

Within the long-term research itinerary Propositions for Non-Fascist Living, BAK asks artists, philosophers, scholars, and activists from multiple (political) geographies facing contemporary fascisms how they engage with the question of what constitutes non-fascist living. The responses are 1–5 minute video statements recorded with technology at hand: mobile phones, voice recorders, Skype. Throughout Propositions, these diverse perspectives are published online and screened at performative conferences. Online and offline, they become part of a growing constellation of reflections on ways to think, act, and bring about non-fascist living. (WM)

15.00–16.00 hrs

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Autonomous Infrastructure and Stories of Hospitality

Isshaq Al-Barbary and Diego Segatto of Campus in Camps with Pelin Tan

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Conversation

What forms of autonomous infrastructure (e.g., in some refugee camps, common kitchens) can become processes, tools, methodologies, strategies for decolonizing? How can we share and explore meanings and understandings of the current lived realities of “hospitality”? How can radical praxis allow for hospitality to become unconditional? BAK 2017–2018 Fellows Pelin Tan as well as Isshaq Al-Barbary and Diego Segatto of Campus in Camps engage in a discussion that relates to our current times of nomadic dwelling and to living conditions in cities and contested territories capable of sustaining decolonized infrastructure.

16.00–16.15 hrs

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Video Statements

Dilar Dirik, Oleksiy Radynski, Delaine Le Bas, and Vijay Prashad

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Four short videos

Within the long-term research itinerary Propositions for Non-Fascist Living, BAK asks artists, philosophers, scholars, and activists from multiple (political) geographies facing contemporary fascisms how they engage with the question of what constitutes non-fascist living. The responses are 1–5 minute video statements recorded with technology at hand: mobile phones, voice recorders, Skype. Throughout Propositions, these diverse perspectives are published online and screened at performative conferences. Online and offline, they become part of a growing constellation of reflections on ways to think, act, and bring about non-fascist living. (WM)

16.15–16.45 hrs

Break

16.45–17.15 hrs

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Werk Woorden—Words of Labour

Matthijs de Bruijne and Migrant Domestic Workers network FNV

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Conversation

In April 2017, the booklet Words of Labour was presented to the Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands. This publication, by the Netherlands Trade Union Confederation (FNV), is a collection of some essential terms from International Labour Organization Convention 189, accompanied by stories from domestic workers in the Netherlands that shed light on the often invisible realities of the facts and figures for this field of labor. During the talk, BAK 2017–2018 Fellow Matthijs de Bruijne—who has been involved as an artist in the domestic workers union organization—and Migrant Domestic Workers network FNV representative Charisma Adams discuss the context of the booklet and ways to claim rights to self-determining gestures. (MdB)

17.15–17.30 hrs

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Video Statements

Stefano Harney and Fred Moten, Isabell Lorey, Mijke van der Drift, and Ana Teixeira Pinto

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Four short videos

Within the long-term research itinerary Propositions for Non-Fascist Living, BAK asks artists, philosophers, scholars, and activists from multiple (political) geographies facing contemporary fascisms how they engage with the question of what constitutes non-fascist living. The responses are 1–5 minute video statements recorded with technology at hand: mobile phones, voice recorders, Skype. Throughout Propositions, these diverse perspectives are published online and screened at performative conferences. Online and offline, they become part of a growing constellation of reflections on ways to think, act, and bring about non-fascist living. (WM)

17.30–18.30 hrs

PERFORMATIVE

MEZZANINE

Discourses Around Evolutionary Population, 2017

Luigi Coppola

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Participative performance

BAK 2017–2018 Fellow and artist Luigi Coppola brings together his ongoing interests in social choreography and “political chorality”—namely, underrepresented communities having voice through public art performances. This collective experiment is part of his research on evolutionary population, which began within Coppola’s projects in Castiglione d’Otranto in the south of Italy. Making use of the writings about interethnic communities by politician and activist Alexander Langer and evolutionary plant breeding by agronomist Salvatore Ceccarelli, the artist coordinates an impromptu choir that addresses these textual sources through a live reading. (ML)

17.30–18.30 hrs

DISCURSIVE

SCREENING ROOM

Born in Flames, 1983

Sepake Angiama

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Screening with live commentary and conversation

Like an evening at the cinema when you are disturbed by your neighbors’ comments on the film, educator, curator, and BAK 2017–2018 Fellow Sepake Angiama engages in live commentary and conversation during a screening of the film Born in Flames (1983), directed by Lizzie Borden. The film address questions of feminism, gender politics, race, surveillance, and police brutality, and these same topics form the foci of the talk.

19.15–19.30 hrs

PERFORMATIVE

AUDITORIUM

Doing Family: Dialectics of Gender and Policy, 2017

Ola Hassanain

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Lecture-performance

This lecture-performance follows up on the assumptions and subjectivities assembled with artist and BAK 2017–2018 Fellow Ola Hassanain’s project Back and Forth (2016–ongoing). The project has raised questions about how we can re-articulate the space of collectives of gender to speak to policies under particular modes of power, and how these political dialogues can then push for a transition from private to public. This lecture-performance is a point of transmission, through performative gestures, of a mode of political dialogue from Khartoum. (OH)

19.30–20.00 hrs

Break

20.00–20.30 hrs

PERFORMATIVE

AUDITORIUM

Whatever Floats Our Boats, 2017

Quinsy Gario

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Lecture-performance

Whatever Floats Our Boats sketches a decolonial positioning of Curaçao on the world stage in the twentieth century. Artist and BAK 2017–2018 Fellow Quinsy Gario presents three instances of resistance to colonial and dictatorial practices on and via the Dutch Caribbean island that had international consequences. Through archival photos, videos, and family stories Gario presents actions of Venezuelan revolutionaries, exiled Portuguese soldiers, and black Curaçao dockworkers that impacted militarization in the Caribbean, the decolonization of Lusophone Africa, and the independence of Surinam. Through images from the archive of the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam, found archival footage on YouTube, and oral histories, another lens is proposed for looking at the political significance of the island.

20.30-21.45 hrs

DISCURSIVE

AUDITORIUM

Beyond White Innocence

Gloria Wekker

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Lecture

Gloria Wekker investigates what it means to cultivate and live in intimate relationships that do not repeat fascist patterns; as in power-hungry or, on the contrary, power-evasive patterns. Struck by contrasting patterns in United States and Dutch interracial relationships, she gives a brief overview of the historical differences and commonalities. Whereas in the US such relationships, especially those between black and white people, are relatively recent and rare, such mixed relationships are much more frequent in the Netherlands. What does that mean? Does it mean that we are beyond race, post-race here? Or are the patterns for religiously mixed people that Dienke Hondius lays out in her 1999 dissertation Gemengde huwelijken, gemengde gevoelens (Mixed Marriages, Mixed Feelings)—evacuation of difference, evasiveness, aphasia—extant in these racially mixed dyads? (GW)

21.45–22.15 hrs

DISCURSIVE

PERFORMATIVE

AUDITORIUM

Conversational Tones, 2017

Wendelien van Oldenborgh and Charl Landvreugd

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Musical and visual battle

Without any wish to undo difference, contradiction, or distance, artist Charl Landvreugd and artist and BAK 2017–2018 Fellow Wendelien van Oldenborgh generate a discourse through a playful “battle” made of musical and visual interactions, with a wide variety of questions, fragments, and choices from their respective and specific idioms: filmmaking, visual arts, theory. Like Mikhail Bakhtin, the Russian philosopher and critic who coined the term polyphony in literature, has argued, multilingual environments “liberate man by opening up a gap between things and their labels.” Nonequivalence is not a matter for despair, but is rather the impulse to life. (WvO)

22.15–22.45 hrs

DISCURSIVE

PERFORMATIVE

AUDITORIUM

Germination, 2017

Otobong Nkanga and Evi Lachana

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Performance

Otobong Nkanga comes together with soap maker Evi Lachana to expand upon the idea of soap—a ubiquitous product essential to our health and central to Nkanga’s work Carved to Flow, 2017. As part of documenta 14, the artist started a performative soapmaking laboratory in Athens, later selling the soap in Kassel. In the performance Germination, Nkanga evokes the previous phases of Carved to Flow and meditates on the networked geographies, traditions, histories, and people engaged in the production of soap, proposing it as a model of social, economic, and conceptual circulation.

22.45-23.30 hrs

PERFORMATIVE

AUDITORIUM

Protest Forms: Memory and Celebration (Acoustic Version), 2016–ongoing

Marinella Senatore

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Performance

What happens when protests “become form”? Does a protest become clearer or stronger through a gesture, a song, a chant in unison? Can the memory of past demonstrations nourish the struggles to come? Help organize new ways of reclaiming the future common good through generations celebrating past achievements? Marinella Senatore brings together an impromptu assembly of Utrecht-based musicians to test these questions as part of her project Protest Forms (2016–ongoing), previously performed in Rome and New York. It is a modest way of continuing the legacy of the center of world cultures RASA, which formerly inhabited the venue at Pauwstraat 13a in Utrecht, and of connecting it to the site’s current endeavor as a platform for the contemporary.

All Day

EXHIBITIONARY

SCREENING ROOM

Reflecting Memory, 2016

Kader Attia

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Film, 48 min.

Reflecting Memory is a documentary video about phantom limb syndrome, featuring interviews with specialists such as surgeons, neurologists, psychoanalysts, and amputees. This pathology, which affects those who have lost a part of their body, involves the persistent sensation of the presence of a limb even after it has been amputated; that is, the perception of pain coming from a body part that actually no longer exists. The work extends into the workings of postcoloniality and beyond, and, in the words of the artist, becomes a “reflection about the complexity of memory, the working of memory, the duty of memory and its representation; about ‘repair’ as a form of ‘re-appropriation,’ but above all as a form of resistance.”

EXHIBITIONARY

FOYER

The Tools’ Dance, 2011–ongoing

Nico Angiuli

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Video archive, variable duration

The Tools’ Dance is an ever-growing video archive of agricultural movements. It involves local communities of farmers, seasonal migrant workers, dancers, and agricultural historians, who come together each new crop for dance workshops in several locations in the Mediterranean and collectively develop Tanztheater performances. The aim is to “collect” and preserve motions and gestures that disappear and transform in the mechanization of the last centuries. Concurrently, the project questions the continuous social transformations in agricultural labor and the role of migrants in this context.

EXHIBITIONARY

SCREENING ROOM

Pre-Image (Blind as the Mother Tongue), 2017

Hiwa K

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Film, 18 min.

When Hiwa K embarked on the journey from his native Sulaymaniyah in Kurdistan-Northern Iraq to become a refugee in Turkey, Greece, and Italy, packed in his bag were only some of his abstract paintings. He revisits part of this journey in this video. While his body was transiting borders, his identity was fragmented into the many roles projected onto him by the gazes of others. These are symbolically represented by the small mirrors that branch out of the antenna he balances on his nose. His image is shattered and merges with the landscape. The anecdotes, memories, and other stories he recalls are what kept his spirit alive and steadily rooted while his life was exposed to death.

EXHIBITIONARY

SCREENING ROOM

Night Time Go, 2017

Karrabing Film Collective

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Screening with introduction and conversation

On 19 September 1943, a group of Karrabing ancestors escaped from a war internment camp and walked over 300 kilometers back to their coastal homelands in Northern Australia. Night Time Go is an exploration of the settler state’s attempt to remove Indigenous people from their lands during the World War II using trucks, trains, and rifles, and the Karrabing ancestors refusing to be detained. The film begins by closely referring to the actual historical details of this ancestral journey, but slowly turns to an alternative history in which the group inspires a general Indigenous insurrection, driving out settlers from the Top End of Australia. Mixing drama and humor, history and satire, Night Time Go pushes subaltern history beyond the bounds of settler propriety.

EXHIBITIONARY

FOYER

Public Smog, 2004–2017

Amy Balkin

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Wallpaper, video presentation

Public Smog is a clean-air park in the atmosphere that fluctuates in location and scale. The park is constructed through financial, legal, and political activities that open it for public use. Since 2004, these include purchasing and withholding greenhouse gas emission offsets in California’s South Coast Air Quality Management District and the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), and ongoing efforts to inscribe Earth’s atmosphere on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Public Smog is subject to prevailing winds and the long-range transport of aerosols and gases. Here on show are a newly commissioned indoor billboard with the sky of Utrecht and a video chronicle of the project.

EXHIBITIONARY

Foyer

The Francis Effect (Dignity Has No Nationality), 2014–ongoing

Tania Bruguera

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Campaign (flag, postcards, petition)

The Francis Effect (Dignity Has No Nationality) aims to change public perception of immigration and redress the assault on the citizenship rights of undocumented migrants throughout the globe. Intended to be a durational work, The Francis Effect (Dignity Has No Nationality) is a letter-writing campaign collecting signatures to be presented to Pope Francis, the first Latin American Bishop of Rome, in support of his message against indifference toward immigrants. Installed are the Pangaea flag that acts as the symbol of the campaign, as well as the manifesto, and postcards to sign the petition. Feel free to sign the petition and to use the hashtags #dignityhasnonationality and #franciseffect.

EXHIBITIONARY

SCREENING ROOM

Transforma tus ideas en acciones cívica/Transform Your Ideas Into Civic Actions, 2017

Tania Bruguera

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Video, 19 min.

Political gestures and civic actions are at the center of the artistic practice of Tania Bruguera, who recently announced her candidacy for President of her native Cuba. In this video, Bruguera addresses some of the ongoing themes and issues of socially engaged artists today. She touches upon some of her most recent works, such as Immigrant Movement International (2010–ongoing), developed in collaboration with Queens Museum in New York and Arendt Institute of Artivism in Havana. Her works are presented as examples and case studies of new practices that involve the artist in novel relationships with institutions and civic society.

EXHIBITIONARY

Foyer

What If Women Ruled the World, 2016

Yael Bartana

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Neon sign

In the film Dr. Strangelove (1964), Stanley Kubrick foresaw a post-apocalyptic future in which dominant male leaders would repopulate the Earth, with ten women allocated to every man. The neon sign by artist Yael Bartana presents the opposite scenario; imagining a condition in which women are in charge of a world in desperate need of a new vision. The work unfolded in a performance that took place at the 2017 Manchester International Festival, in which groups of female experts were confronted with some of the urgent crises of our time. These scientists, politicians, activists, and thinkers of global reputation spent the evening attempting to solve the global emergencies as the clock ticked.

EXHIBITIONARY

Mezzanine

Art of the Possible: Towards an Antifascist Feminist Front, 2017

Angela Dimitrakaki, Sanja Iveković, and Antonia Majaca

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Instigated aural intervention, sound installation

Writer Angela Dimitrakaki and theorist Antonia Majaca were invited by artist Sanja Iveković to animate her Monument to Revolution (2017), installed in Athens in the context of documenta 14. The original Berlin monument of the same title (in memory of Communist Party of Germany founders Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht) was destroyed by the Nazis in 1935. The new monument is set symbolically in Athens, where the struggle against capitalism is rife. Thirty international feminist contributors, both individuals and collectives, were asked to each send a short recording about fascism and the importance of feminist struggle against it. Sound sculptor AGF scored the multi-lingual collection of recordings here installed.

EXHIBITIONARY

FOYER

MEZZANINE

SMALL ROOMS

Clips (Untitled), 2015–2016

Antonis Pittas

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Dispersed installation with clipboards of various materials, with various printed media, a rubber band, aluminum clips, variable dimensions

This work is composed of a number of old-fashioned clipboards scattered around the space and reproduced in very expensive materials such as marble and bronze; materials usually used for government buildings or public sculpture and with bureaucratic or “official” connotations. Attached to these are various collages of images and text excerpts decontextualized from their original context, playing new roles in their novel relationships to the surrounding events. The monumentality conveyed by the chosen materials suggests, in the words of the artist Antonis Pittas, the idea of “capturing and framing public memories in the making.”

EXHIBITIONARY

FOYER

Untitled, 2013

Aernout Mik

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video documentation of a performance, 25 min. (loop)

Aernout Mik’s performance Untitled was realized in the context of FORMER WEST: Documents, Constellations, Prospects at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, 2013. Unannounced, 100 professional and amateur actors attended the seven-day event, silently building presence and familiarity with the public. At the near-conclusion of the event, at the end of a lecture by art theorist Piotr Piotrowski titled “Global Agoraphilia” about the potentials of the collective to shape contemporary public life, the performers erupted into a collective uprising as they, dispersed among the audience, began “speaking in tongues.” Intervening in the language and setting of a conference, Mik’s work made manifest both the disruptive and propositional power of the unintelligible in art and collective action.

EXHIBITIONARY

SMALL ROOMS

Big Rock Candy Mountain, 2015

Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh, and Hesam Rahmanian

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Video, 4 min. (loop)

This animation addresses the so-called Islamic State’s sustained destruction of artifacts, buildings, and monuments of cultural heritage and human history. The artists ask where this destruction comes from, what it means, and test a tentative answer with philosopher Judith Butler’s idea that rage is born of intense grief. Over 2,500 media images and stills were manipulated by the artists through collage, painting, or drawing to create what they call “moving paintings.” The aim is to elicit “astonishment rather than empathy” from the viewer, calling for critical analyses of the depicted scenes so that the images, in their words, “land in the region of none-violence.”

EXHIBITIONARY

SMALL ROOMS

Piratensender, 2017

Ahmet Öğüt

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Radio station

Piratensender, which means pirate station in German, is a project in which artist Ahmet Öğüt presents a series of interviews and dialogues with lawyers, immigration law experts, broadcasters, socio-cultural workers, musicians, urban subcultural groups, and feminist and LGBTQI+ activists on radical pedagogies, the concept of urban citizenship, self-proclaimed micronations, artists’ rights, alternative currencies, unconditional basic income, immaterial labor, precarious labor, domestic labor, and the necessity of self-initiative, participation, and autonomy as tools of resistance for marginalized communities, undocumented masses, and non-citizens. On this occasion, Öğüt realizes a new and broadcasts previous episodes through a collaboration with Utrecht-based online radio station Stranded.FM.

EXHIBITIONARY

SMALL ROOMS

Reverie. On the Liberation from Work, 2017

Danilo Correale

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Installation with vinyl records, turntables, headphones

Reverie. On the Liberation from Work is a two-chapter guided hypnosis exercise aimed at deeply relaxing one’s body and mind in preparation for a future without work. Think of “reverie” as a tool to help you visualize what a life free of work can be. This hypnotic exercise guides one on a peaceful journey of the mind to explore a realm where work is no longer needed, and where the dream of universal basic income has finally succeeded.

EXHIBITIONARY

Careful and Careless Tasks, 2017

Koki Tanaka

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Performative instructions

At the entrance of BAK, visitors receive a handout titled Careful and Careless Tasks with instructions, penned for the occasion by artist Koki Tanaka. The artist invites the audience to reflect on smaller or bigger gestures of their everyday lives, those that affect collectivity and our relationships with one another, impacting the overall atmosphere of the gathering. Following his interest in the relationships between human beings in the most diverse contexts and scenarios, this new work is inspired by the “I Care” sign that was hanging in a classroom of educator and priest Don Lorenzo Milani’s School of Barbiana, Barbiana, founded in the 1950s, in opposition to the fascist slogan “I Don’t Care.” (ML)

A vegetarian lunch (€5) and dinner (€8) can be purchased during the event. Catering by Utrecht-based Rammenas and Koffie Leute.



With

BAK 2017-2018
FELLOWS

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS

  • Sepake Angiama
  • Isshaq Al-Barbary and Diego Segatto (Campus in Camps)
  • Matthijs de Bruijne
  • Luigi Coppola
  • Quinsy Gario
  • Ola Hassanain
  • Otobong Nkanga
  • Wendelien van Oldenborgh
  • Pelin Tan
  • Nico Angiuli
  • Kader Attia
  • Amy Balkin
  • Yael Bartana
  • Tania Bruguera
  • Danilo Correale
  • Angela Dimitrakaki
  • Dilar Dirik
  • Mijke van der Drift
  • Ramin Haerizadeh
  • Rokni Haerizadeh
  • Stefano Harney
  • Sanja Iveković
  • Hiwa K
  • Karrabing Film Collective
  • Evi Lachana
  • Charl Landvreugd
  • Delaine Le Bas
  • Isabell Lorey
  • Sven Lütticken
  • Antonia Majaca
  • Migrant Domestic Workers network FNV
  • Aernout Mik
  • Fred Moten
  • Ahmet Öğüt
  • Antonis Pittas
  • Elizabeth A. Povinelli
  • Nina Power
  • Vijay Prashad
  • Oleksiy Radynski
  • Hesam Rahmanian
  • Pedro Reyes
  • Marinella Senatore
  • Koki Tanaka
  • Ana Teixeira Pinto
  • Gloria Wekker
  • Giovanna Zapperi
  • Vivian Ziherl

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS

  • Nico Angiuli
  • Kader Attia
  • Amy Balkin
  • Yael Bartana
  • Tania Bruguera
  • Danilo Correale
  • Angela Dimitrakaki
  • Dilar Dirik
  • Mijke van der Drift
  • Ramin Haerizadeh
  • Rokni Haerizadeh
  • Stefano Harney
  • Sanja Iveković
  • Hiwa K
  • Karrabing Film Collective
  • Evi Lachana
  • Charl Landvreugd
  • Delaine Le Bas
  • Isabell Lorey
  • Sven Lütticken
  • Antonia Majaca
  • Migrant Domestic Workers network FNV
  • Aernout Mik
  • Fred Moten
  • Ahmet Öğüt
  • Antonis Pittas
  • Elizabeth A. Povinelli
  • Nina Power
  • Vijay Prashad
  • Oleksiy Radynski
  • Hesam Rahmanian
  • Pedro Reyes
  • Marinella Senatore
  • Koki Tanaka
  • Ana Teixeira Pinto
  • Gloria Wekker
  • Giovanna Zapperi
  • Vivian Ziherl

Basics Journal

Basics is the forthcoming journal by BAK. For BAK publications to date, please visit bakonline.org